NGC 2023 – Horsehead and Flame Nebulae 01-06-16

That was a tough processing challenge working through all that light pollution to reveal the Horsehead and Flame nebulae. This is the best I could produce with my minimal knowledge of Pixinsight, switching between Harry’s Astroshed tutorials and scavenging online for other tips and tricks to editing DSLR images in PixInsight. I’m pretty pleased with this as it is hard to pull out much detail after removing light pollution without adding too much of that blotchy grainy noise in the background.

NGC 2023 – Horsehead and Flame Nebulae 01-06-16

Taken from a light polluted zone (red Bortle scale)
Telescope: Omni XLT 150
Mount: CG-5
Orion Starshoot Autoguider
Guiding in Linux with Lin_Guider
Modded Canon 350D

42 images at 5 minutes a piece. With 30 Flats, 30 Bias, and 40 Dark frames.

Straight out of the camera single image.

Andromeda – M31 September 04, 2015

This image is of the Andromeda galaxy taken on September 04, 2015. This image contains 6 images at 5 minutes a piece, along with 20 flat frames, 20 bias frames, and 20 dark frames. Processing, and post processing were all done in PixInsight.

Andromeda 09-04-15

This is only the second image I have ever processed completely in PixInsight so this is still a learning experience for me. I followed a tutorial on Light Vortex page on the steps to get a fully processed image using masks, and HDR tools.

I know I have been slacking on updating and posting here to my blog and I hope to get out more in the near future to continue imaging and editing the cosmos for you all to enjoy.

Equipment:
Omni XLT 150
CG-5 Advanced Series Go-To
Lin_Guider in Linux for autoguiding
Orion Starshoot Autoguider
Modified Canon 350D
Baader MPCC Mark III Coma Corrector

NGC 7023 – The Iris Nebula

In the constellation of Cepheus during the fall months you can find NGC 7023. The Iris Nebula is a large reflection nebula with an apparent magnitude of 6.8. This nebula is lit by the bright star SAO 19158 at a magnitude of 7. It lies in the Milky Way about 1300 light years away from our solar system, and has a radius of 3 light years making it 6 light years across.

Location of NGC 7023

Location of NGC 7023

Through the eyepiece of my 6” telescope from my light polluted skies this nebula was not visible. Upon further magnification of the central star it started to appear a bit fuzzy. In the field of view there was the one bright central star and multiple dim stars scattered lightly through the field.

NGC 7023 taken on 07-18-14

Taken on the night of July 18, 2014. This image consists of 22 images at 300 seconds each, 17 flat frames, and 18 dark frames. Stacked in Deep Sky Stacker and post processing done in Photoshop.

Equipment:
Omni XLT 150
CG-5 Advanced Series Go-To
PHD Autoguiding
Orion Starshoot Autoguider
Modified Canon 350D

NGC 281 – The Pacman Nebula

Within the constellation Cassiopeia at a distance of 9,200 light years from earth is NGC 281. This nebula is in the Perseus arm of our Milky Way galaxy and includes the star cluster IC 1590 which is formed from around 279 individual stars in and about the cluster. Due to the darker nebulous regions of the cluster it has been dubbed the Pacman Nebula after the video game character. Discovered in 1883 by E. E. Barnard who described it as a “large faint nebula.”

Location of NGC 281 in Cassiopeia.

Location of NGC 281 in Cassiopeia.

In a clear dark sky you should be able to spot this nebula with an amateur telescope. From my backyard I couldn’t make out the nebula no matter how dark adapted my eyes were.

NGC 281 – The Pacman Nebula 08-01-2014

This image of composed of 23@300 second light frames, 13 flat frames, and 25 dark frames. Stacking done in deep sky stacker and post processing done in Photoshop.

Equipment:
Omni XLT 150
CG-5 Advanced Series Go-To
PHD autoguiding
Orion Starshoot autoguider
Modified Canon 350D

NGC 6992 – The Eastern Veil Nebula

The brightest portion of the Easter Veil Nebula is the region of NGC 6992. This is just a small section of the entire Cygnus Loop. The Cygnus Loop consists of the Western Veil , Eastern Veil, and Pickering’s Triangle. Discovered on September 5, 1784 by William Herschel, he described the western end as ex extending through the star 52 Cygni and roughly 2 degrees in length. He also described the eastern veil as branching nebulosity stringing and coming together towards the southern end. This nebula is large, but relatively faint, and it is a supernova remnant. The source of the supernova is estimated between 5,000 and 8,000 years ago. The entire Cygnus Loop covers and area of 3 degrees in diameter with an estimated distance of 1,470 light years from Earth. Analysis by the Hubble Space Telescope indicate the presence of oxygen, sulfur, and hydrogen.

Location of the Eastern Veil Nebula

Location of the Eastern Veil Nebula

Through the eyepiece I couldn’t see the nebula, and even a 2 minute photo it was very faint and hard to spot. The 5 minute images brought out more of the nebula and showed hints of the blues tucked into the red. Maybe the ¾ moon played a roll in washing it out so it was hard to see in the eyepiece.

Eastern Veil Nebula taken June 08, 2014

This image is 18 shots at 5 minutes each ISO 800. 33 Flat frames, and 20 dark frames. Stacked in deep sky stacker and post processing in Photoshop.

Equipment:
Omni XLT 150
CG-5 Advanced Series Go-To
PHD autoguiding
Orion Starshoot autoguider
Modified Canon 350D