NGC 6992 – The Eastern Veil Nebula

The brightest portion of the Easter Veil Nebula is the region of NGC 6992. This is just a small section of the entire Cygnus Loop. The Cygnus Loop consists of the Western Veil , Eastern Veil, and Pickering’s Triangle. Discovered on September 5, 1784 by William Herschel, he described the western end as ex extending through the star 52 Cygni and roughly 2 degrees in length. He also described the eastern veil as branching nebulosity stringing and coming together towards the southern end. This nebula is large, but relatively faint, and it is a supernova remnant. The source of the supernova is estimated between 5,000 and 8,000 years ago. The entire Cygnus Loop covers and area of 3 degrees in diameter with an estimated distance of 1,470 light years from Earth. Analysis by the Hubble Space Telescope indicate the presence of oxygen, sulfur, and hydrogen.

Location of the Eastern Veil Nebula

Location of the Eastern Veil Nebula

Through the eyepiece I couldn’t see the nebula, and even a 2 minute photo it was very faint and hard to spot. The 5 minute images brought out more of the nebula and showed hints of the blues tucked into the red. Maybe the ¾ moon played a roll in washing it out so it was hard to see in the eyepiece.

Eastern Veil Nebula taken June 08, 2014

This image is 18 shots at 5 minutes each ISO 800. 33 Flat frames, and 20 dark frames. Stacked in deep sky stacker and post processing in Photoshop.

Equipment:
Omni XLT 150
CG-5 Advanced Series Go-To
PHD autoguiding
Orion Starshoot autoguider
Modified Canon 350D

IC 405 – Flaming Star Nebula

IC405, also known as the Flaming Star Nebula in the constellation Auriga. This nebula is an emission/reflection nebula which seems to surround the bright star AE Aurigae which shines at a magnitude of 6.0. AE Aurigae is an irregular varriable star. IC 405 lies about 1500 light-years away and a width of 5 light-years across. The central star can be traced back to the Orion’s belt area.

IC 405 Location in Auriga

IC 405 Location in Auriga

This nebula was not visible through the eyepiece of the telescope, and was only showing in some of it’s brighter areas in the 5 minute images.

IC 405 images on the nights of March 3, 5, and 6, 2014

Taken on the nights of March 3, 5, and 6, 2014. A total of 90 images stacked in Deep Sky Stacker and post processing in Photoshop. This was my first multiple night imaging session, and only my second imaging session with my new CG-5 mount with PHD guiding. Each image is a 5 minute exposure at ISO 800. I need a bit more practice with my image acquisitions over a course of many nights, but for my first attempt this wasn’t too bad.

IC 59 and IC 63 – Ghost of Cassiopeia

Found in the constellation Cassiopeia near the bright variable star, Gamma Cassiopeia, also known as Navi. The orbital period of this binary star is about 204 days with the companion star being estimated to have a mass similar to our sun.

These two nebulae are only 3 to 4 light years away from the bright star within the image. IC 59 is the fainter of the two with IC 63 being the brighter almost cone shaped nebula. IC 63 is dominated by H-Alpha light and IC 59 has significantly less H-alpha emissions with a more blue tint reflected from star light. Both nebula are emission and reflection nebulas.

IC 59 and IC 63 location in Cassiopeia

IC 59 and IC 63 location in Cassiopeia

Through my telescope I couldn’t make out the nebula, but with it’s close proximity to Gamma Cassiopeia I was able to frame both nebula without too much of an issue. I couldn’t make out the binary star of Gamma Cass through my telescope.

IC 59 and IC 63 near Gamma Cassiopeia in the constellation Cassiopeia 11-29-13

This image is 74 images at 2 minutes a piece with ISO 800, 62 dark frames, and 36 flat frames. Images stacked in Deep Sky Stacker and post processing in Photoshop.

I will have to go back to this nebula and try again with either longer exposures or a higher ISO to see if I can get more detail in IC 59, and maybe more of IC 63. I had to stretch this image quite a bit to get both nebula to show in the image.

Screen shot of object location taken in Stellarium http://www.stellarium.org. Image stacking in Deep Sky Stacker http://deepskystacker.free.fr/english/index.html.

Equipment:
Omni XLT 150 with CG-4 mount
Modded Canon 350D
T-ring and adapter
Intervalometer
Polar Scope for alignment

M52 and NGC 7635 – Open Cluster and Bubble Nebula

Open Cluster, M52, discovered by Charles Messier in 1774, can be found in a rich field of the Milky Way. M52 has been dubbed the name “salt and pepper” cluster. The distance to the cluster is not very well known, but estimates anywhere from 3,000 light years to 7,000 light years, but the Sky Catalogue 2000.0 gives it a distance of 5,200 light years. Estimates are complicated due to higher interstellar absorption the light suffered during its travels toward Earth. Using 5,000 light years as an average the clusters diameter is estimated to be around 13 arc minutes corresponding to a diameter of 19 light years.

The Bubble Nebula, NGC 7635, discovered by William Herschel in 1787, lies in close proximity to the open cluster, M52. The bubble formed from stellar winds from the massively hot central star (SAO 20575 or BD+60°2522) at an 8th magnitude. The nebula itself has an estimated distance of 11,000 light years away with an apparent magnitude of ~10, and a diameter of 15 x 8 arc minutes.

Location of M52 and NGC 7635.

Location of M52 and NGC 7635.

Through the eyepiece from a nice dark location it is easy to make out M52 just fine and count many of the main stars within the cluster without the use of averted vision. The bubble nebula is a little more of a challenge. When I imaged the picture below there was an 88% moon which made it impossible for me to find NGC 7635.

M52 and NGC 7635 – Open Cluster and Bubble Nebula. 08-17-13

This image is 65 x 120 sec light frames, 33 dark frames, 33 flat frames, and 43 bias frames. Taken on the night of August 17, 2013 with an 88% moon washing out a lot of the sky. Image stacked in Deep Sky Stacker and post processing in Photoshop. There were some major editing I had to do in order to clear out noise created from thin clouds on occasion, and the light of the moon making my illumination a bit uneven.

All my Messier Object information from: The Messier Catalog. Screen shot of object location taken in Stellarium. Image stacking in Deep Sky Stacker.

Equipment:
Omni XLT 150 with CG-4 mount
Modded Canon 350D
T-ring and adapter
Intervalometer
Polar Scope for alignment

NGC 6888 – Crescent Nebula

NGC 6888 (also known as Caldwell 27, and Sharpless 105) is commonly known as the Crescent Nebula and can be found in the constellation, Cygnus, The Swan. This nebula lies in the vast star field of the Milky Way galaxy and is estimated to be around 5000 light years away. Discovered in 1792 by Friedrick Wilhelm Herschel. This nebula is formed by fast stellar winds of the star HD 192163 as the winds collide with slower moving winds caused by the star turning a red giant some 250000-400000 years ago. The shape you see is caused by the emission nebula, and more can be seen in X-Ray.

Blue box around the location of NGC 6888.

Blue box around the location of NGC 6888.

NGC 6888 can be found 2° southwest of the Sadr region, and star Sadr. Not visible in small scopes without the help of a UHC, or an OIII filter. Larger scopes in dark enough skies can start to make out the crescent shaped nebula.

NGC 6888 – Crescent Nebula. 08-10-13

This image is 53 light frames at 120 seconds a piece, 44 dark frames, 33 flat frames, and 50 bias frames. Stacking done in Deep Sky Stacker, and post processing was done in Photoshop.

Screen shot of object location taken in Stellarium. Image stacking in Deep Sky Stacker.

Equipment:
Omni XLT 150 with CG-4 mount
Modded Canon 350D
T-ring and adapter
Intervalometer
Polar Scope for alignment