IC 5070 – The Pelican Nebula

IC 5070 lies closely to the nebula NGC 7000 in the constellation, Cygnus. This large emission nebula looks like a pelican to some viewers which gives it its name, The Pelican Nebula. The Pelican lies close to the star Deneb, about 1800 light years from our solar system, and the dark space splitting IC 5070 and NGC 7000 is actually a dark nebula. The Pelican Nebula is an active star forming region that is highly studied due to it’s evolving gas clouds.

This nebula has an apparent magnitude of 8.0, but due to its large size it was not visible in my telescope from my back yard. I had to use the camera to try to center it the best I could for imaging.

IC 5070 – The Pelican Nebula 06-27-2014

This is 17 images at 5 minutes a piece, 22 dark frames, 22 flat frames, and 22 bias frames. Stacked in deep sky stacker and post processing in Photoshop. I personally don’t see a pelican in this nebula whether it’s my picture or one of the others out there online, but either way this is a huge and beautiful nebula.

Equipment:
Omni XLT 150
CG-5 Advanced Series Go-To
PHD autoguiding
Orion Starshoot autoguider
Modified Canon 350D

NGC 6992 – The Eastern Veil Nebula

The brightest portion of the Easter Veil Nebula is the region of NGC 6992. This is just a small section of the entire Cygnus Loop. The Cygnus Loop consists of the Western Veil , Eastern Veil, and Pickering’s Triangle. Discovered on September 5, 1784 by William Herschel, he described the western end as ex extending through the star 52 Cygni and roughly 2 degrees in length. He also described the eastern veil as branching nebulosity stringing and coming together towards the southern end. This nebula is large, but relatively faint, and it is a supernova remnant. The source of the supernova is estimated between 5,000 and 8,000 years ago. The entire Cygnus Loop covers and area of 3 degrees in diameter with an estimated distance of 1,470 light years from Earth. Analysis by the Hubble Space Telescope indicate the presence of oxygen, sulfur, and hydrogen.

Location of the Eastern Veil Nebula

Location of the Eastern Veil Nebula

Through the eyepiece I couldn’t see the nebula, and even a 2 minute photo it was very faint and hard to spot. The 5 minute images brought out more of the nebula and showed hints of the blues tucked into the red. Maybe the ¾ moon played a roll in washing it out so it was hard to see in the eyepiece.

Eastern Veil Nebula taken June 08, 2014

This image is 18 shots at 5 minutes each ISO 800. 33 Flat frames, and 20 dark frames. Stacked in deep sky stacker and post processing in Photoshop.

Equipment:
Omni XLT 150
CG-5 Advanced Series Go-To
PHD autoguiding
Orion Starshoot autoguider
Modified Canon 350D

NGC 6888 – Crescent Nebula

NGC 6888 (also known as Caldwell 27, and Sharpless 105) is commonly known as the Crescent Nebula and can be found in the constellation, Cygnus, The Swan. This nebula lies in the vast star field of the Milky Way galaxy and is estimated to be around 5000 light years away. Discovered in 1792 by Friedrick Wilhelm Herschel. This nebula is formed by fast stellar winds of the star HD 192163 as the winds collide with slower moving winds caused by the star turning a red giant some 250000-400000 years ago. The shape you see is caused by the emission nebula, and more can be seen in X-Ray.

Blue box around the location of NGC 6888.

Blue box around the location of NGC 6888.

NGC 6888 can be found 2° southwest of the Sadr region, and star Sadr. Not visible in small scopes without the help of a UHC, or an OIII filter. Larger scopes in dark enough skies can start to make out the crescent shaped nebula.

NGC 6888 – Crescent Nebula. 08-10-13

This image is 53 light frames at 120 seconds a piece, 44 dark frames, 33 flat frames, and 50 bias frames. Stacking done in Deep Sky Stacker, and post processing was done in Photoshop.

Screen shot of object location taken in Stellarium. Image stacking in Deep Sky Stacker.

Equipment:
Omni XLT 150 with CG-4 mount
Modded Canon 350D
T-ring and adapter
Intervalometer
Polar Scope for alignment

IC 1318 – The Sadr Region

The Sadr region is an emissions nebula surrounding the star Sadr (Gamma Cygni) in the constellation Cygnus; the central star in the “Northern Cross,” and the third brightest star in the constellation. Sadr comes from the Arabic phrase meaning “the hen’s breast.” This star and nebula are placed in the northern portion of the great rift of the Milky Way. This region spans quite a large distance, but my camera view only captures about 1 degree of the whole area. IC 1318 also contains a few dark nebulae.

Location of the Sadr Region

Location of the Sadr Region

Although this nebula is listed as a 2.2 magnitude I was unable to make out any of it through my telescope. Upon shooting long exposures you can start to make out the reds of the nebulous region around the bright star, Sadr.

IC1318 – Sadr Region 07-09-13

This image is 58 images at 2 minutes a piece, ISO 800, 27 dark frames, and 33 flat frames. Stacked in Deep Sky Stacker, and post processing done in Photoshop.

Equipment:
Omni XLT 150 with CG-4 mount
Modded Canon 350D
T-ring and adapter
Intervalometer
Polar Scope for alignment